Monday, September 18, 2017

It's Monday! What Are You Reading?

Two weeks at once because I just wasn't on top of things what with my parents evacuating to my house to escape Irma and then finding yet *another* thing falling apart about my house. ::sigh:: This meme is hosted by Kathryn at Reading Date.

Books I completed this past week are:

Song of Two Worlds by Alan Lightman
The Heart's Invisible Furies by John Boyne
Old Herbaceous by Reginald Arkell
The Other Alcott by Elise Hooper
The Original Ginny Moon by Benjamin Ludwig
A Season of Ruin by Anna Bradley
Incontinent on the Continent by Jane Christmas

Bookmarks are still living in the middle of:

A Well-Made Bed by Abby Frucht and Laurie Alberts
The Children's Crusade by Ann Packer
The Lake House by Kate Morton
Shelter by Jung Yun
The Center of the World by Jacqueline Sheehan
A Manual For Cleaning Women by Lucia Berlin
The Beauty of the End by Debbie Howells
Country of Red Azaleas by Domnica Radulescu
A Hard and Heavy Thing by Matthew J. Hefti
Paint Your Wife by Lloyd Jones
The Company They Kept edited by Robert B. Silvers and Barbara Epstein
No One Can Pronounce My Name by Rakesh Satyal
Lily and the Octopus by Stephen Rowley
Thousand-Miler by Melanie Radzicki McManus
Dear Fang, With Love by Rufi Thorpe
Close Enough to Touch by Colleen Oakley
America's First Daughter by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie
Hope Has Two Daughters by Monia Mazigh
After the Bloom by Leslie Shimotakahara
Metis Beach by Claudine Bourbonnais
We Were the Lucky Ones by Georgia Hunter
Smoke by Dan Vyleta

Reviews posted this week:

The Long Run by Catriona Menzies-Pike

Books still needing to have reviews written (as opposed to the ones that are simply awaiting posting):

The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
The Woman Next Door by Yewande Omotoso
To Love the Coming End by Leanne Dunic
The Peculiar Life of a Lonely Postman by Denis Theriault
A Loving, Faithful Animal by Josephine Rowe
City Mouse by Stacey Lender
Cutting Back by Leslie Buck
Siracusa by Delia Ephron
The Wife, the Maid, and the Mistress by Ariel Lawhon
A Narrow Bridge by J.J. Gersher
The Never-Open Desert Diner by James Anderson
The Heart of Henry Quantum by Pepper Harding
The Hearts of Men by Nickolas Butler
Dance of the Jakaranda by Peter Kimani
How to Survive a Summer by Nick White
Bramton Wick by Elizabeth Fair
The Finishing School by Joanna Goodman
Meet Me in the In-Between by Bella Pollen
All Grown Up by Jami Attenberg
The Island of Books by Dominique Fortier
Lights On, Rats Out by Cree LeFavour
Salt Houses by Hala Alyan
Him, Me, Muhammad Ali by Randa Jarrar
What Are the Blind Men Dreaming? by Noemi Jaffee
Girl in Snow by Danya Kukafka
The Lying Game by Ruth Ware
The Talker by Mary Sojourner
When the Sky Fell Apart by Caroline Lea
The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid
'Round Midnight by Laura McBride
The German Girl by Armando Lucas Correa
The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See
The Jane Austen Project by Kathleen A. Flynn
Last Things by Marissa Moss
All Our Wrong Todays by Elan Mastai
Civilianized by Michael Anthony
The Redemption of Galen Pike by Carys Davies
Woman No. 17 by Edan Lepucki
In the Woods of Memory by Shun Medoruma
Before the Wind by Jim Lynch
Dinner with Edward by Isabel Vincent
Inhabited by Charlie Quimby
Pachinko by Min Jin Lee
One Good Mama Bone by Bren McClain
The Excellent Lombards by Jane Hamilton
You and I and Someone Else by Anna Schachner
Meantime by Katharine Noel
The Portrait by Antoine Laurain
So Much Blue by Perceval Everett
The Velveteen Daughter by Laurel Davis Huber
Mothers and Other Strangers by Gina Sorell
This Must Be the Place by Maggie O'Farrell
How to Find Love in a Bookshop by Veronica Henry
Between Them by Richard Ford
Kinship of Clover by Ellen Meeropol
The Life She Was Given by Ellen Marie Wiseman
The Clay Girl by Heather Tucker
Morningstar by Ann Hood
Lucky Boy by Shanthi Sekaran
Song of Two Worlds by Alan Lightman
The Heart's Invisible Furies by John Boyne
Old Herbaceous by Reginald Arkell
The Other Alcott by Elise Hooper
The Original Ginny Moon by Benjamin Ludwig
A Season of Ruin by Anna Bradley
Incontinent on the Continent by Jane Christmas

Monday Mailbox

This past two week's mailbox arrivals:

Caroline by Sarah Miller came from William Morrow and TLC Book Tours for a blog tour.

Little House on the Prairie from Ma Ingalls' perspective? Oh yes, I'll happily read that!

The Other Alcott by Elise Hooper came from William Morrow and TLC Book Tours for a blog tour.

Amy March in Little Women was kind of a selfish brat so I'm curious to see what May Alcott, the inspiration for the character her sister created, was like, at least in this fictionalized version of her life.

Last Christmas in Paris by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb came from William Morrow and TLC Book Tours for a blog tour.

A romantic epistolary novel that moves between WWI and 1968 in Paris, this looks amazing!

Christmas at Little Beach Street Bakery by Jenny Colgan came from William Morrow and TLC Book Tours for a blog tour.

I'm extremely excited to go back to Mount Polbearne and back to Polly and Huckle, especially during the Christmas season.

The Way to London by Alix Rickloff came from William Morrow and TLC Book Tours for a blog tour.

Another WWII novel but this one takes a bit of a different take as it focuses on a young woman who was the last person safely out of Singapore and sent to England, a young evacuee searching for his mother, and an invalided soldier from Singapore. This looks wonderful.

If you want to see the marvelous goodies in other people's mailboxes, make sure to visit Mailbox Monday and have fun seeing how we are all doing our part to keep the USPS and delivery services viable.

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Review: The Long Run by Catriona Menzies-Pike

Have you ever driven down the street when it's raining or snowing or it's blistering hot and you see someone out running? Unless you are a runner yourself, you probably write that person off as completely crazy. You might even write off as crazy a runner out on a perfectly temperate day if you aren't a runner yourself. So why exactly do people run? Why do women in particular run? Catriona Menzie-Pike looks at the larger culture of women running through history as well as how she herself came to running to overcome a decade of grief. Her thoughtful and intelligent memoir, The Long Run, is a personal, political, and social history of running.

When Catriona Menzies-Pike was just twenty years old and starting her adult life, her parents were killed in a plane crash. Ten years after that, she started running. If that makes the two sound unconnected, it shouldn't. Running became a good and healthy way for her to find her path through the grief that still sat heavily on her and it also became a way for her to learn about herself and the women who ran before her. Menzies-Pike calls herself a complacent runner rather than a competitive one but even a complacent runner is transformed by the freedom of movement. She stumbled into running a half marathon and found herself while out on the roads and paths she trod. She ran into any number of road blocks on her way to her many races but through it all, she persevered. Woven in with her own personal journey, is the history of the marathon and specifically women's place in that history. She looks at the advances of women in running as a mirror of the growth in feminism, changing social perceptions of women's abilities and place in the world, and the ongoing long run towards equality. The narrative can veer off on tangents and some chapters feel more like essays than through narrative so this is definitely not a traditional memoir but over all it works. Runners, those interested in running history, and feminists will find much to enjoy here. And maybe it will inspire some non-runners to lace up running shoes for the first time and to stride off into the rich history of women running.

Thanks to the publisher and LibraryThing Early Reviewers for sending me a copy of the book to review.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Waiting on Wednesday

This meme is hosted by Breaking the Spine and is meant to highlight some great pre-publication books we all can't wait to get our grubby little mitts on.

From Scratch by Gail Anderson-Dargatz.

The book is being released by Orca Book Publishers on September 26, 2017.

Amazon says this about the book: Cookie is about to lose her job at the local bakery. She dreams of owning her own bakery but doesn't think she has the skills or money to do it. Most of all, she doesn't have the self-confidence. When she takes a course at the local college, she finds she has much more going for her than she imagined. With the help of her community, she figures out how to make sure no one has to go without her famous doily cookies for long!

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Waiting on Wednesday

This meme is hosted by Breaking the Spine and is meant to highlight some great pre-publication books we all can't wait to get our grubby little mitts on.

The Good People by Hannah Kent.

The book is being released by Little, Brown and Co. on September 19, 2017.

Amazon says this about the book: Based on true events in nineteenth century Ireland, Hannah Kent's startling new novel tells the story of three women, drawn together to rescue child from a superstitious community. Nora, bereft after the death of her husband, finds herself alone and caring for her grandson Micheál, who can neither speak nor walk. A handmaid, Mary, arrives to help Nóra just as rumours begin to spread that Micheál is a changeling child who is bringing bad luck to the valley. Determined to banish evil, Nora and Mary enlist the help of Nance, an elderly wanderer who understands the magic of the old ways.

Set in a lost world bound by its own laws, THE GOOD PEOPLE is Hannah Kent's startling new novel about absolute belief and devoted loveTerrifying, thrilling and moving in equal measure, this follow-up to Burial Rites shows an author at the height of her powers.

Monday, September 4, 2017

It's Monday! What Are You Reading?

This meme is hosted by Kathryn at Reading Date.

Books I completed this past week are:

The Girl With Kaleidoscope Eyes by David Handler
Morningstar by Ann Hood
Lucky Boy by Shanthi Sekaran

Bookmarks are still living in the middle of:

A Well-Made Bed by Abby Frucht and Laurie Alberts
The Children's Crusade by Ann Packer
The Lake House by Kate Morton
Shelter by Jung Yun
The Center of the World by Jacqueline Sheehan
A Manual For Cleaning Women by Lucia Berlin
The Beauty of the End by Debbie Howells
Country of Red Azaleas by Domnica Radulescu
A Hard and Heavy Thing by Matthew J. Hefti
Paint Your Wife by Lloyd Jones
The Company They Kept edited by Robert B. Silvers and Barbara Epstein
No One Can Pronounce My Name by Rakesh Satyal
Lily and the Octopus by Stephen Rowley
Thousand-Miler by Melanie Radzicki McManus
Dear Fang, With Love by Rufi Thorpe
Close Enough to Touch by Colleen Oakley
America's First Daughter by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie
Hope Has Two Daughters by Monia Mazigh
After the Bloom by Leslie Shimotakahara
Metis Beach by Claudine Bourbonnais
We Were the Lucky Ones by Georgia Hunter
The Heart's Invisible Furies by John Boyne
Smoke by Dan Vyleta

Reviews posted this week:

The Girl with Kaleidoscope Eyes by David Handler

Books still needing to have reviews written (as opposed to the ones that are simply awaiting posting):

The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
The Woman Next Door by Yewande Omotoso
To Love the Coming End by Leanne Dunic
The Peculiar Life of a Lonely Postman by Denis Theriault
A Loving, Faithful Animal by Josephine Rowe
City Mouse by Stacey Lender
Cutting Back by Leslie Buck
Siracusa by Delia Ephron
The Wife, the Maid, and the Mistress by Ariel Lawhon
A Narrow Bridge by J.J. Gersher
The Never-Open Desert Diner by James Anderson
The Heart of Henry Quantum by Pepper Harding
The Hearts of Men by Nickolas Butler
Dance of the Jakaranda by Peter Kimani
How to Survive a Summer by Nick White
Bramton Wick by Elizabeth Fair
The Finishing School by Joanna Goodman
Meet Me in the In-Between by Bella Pollen
All Grown Up by Jami Attenberg
The Island of Books by Dominique Fortier
Lights On, Rats Out by Cree LeFavour
Salt Houses by Hala Alyan
Him, Me, Muhammad Ali by Randa Jarrar
What Are the Blind Men Dreaming? by Noemi Jaffee
Girl in Snow by Danya Kukafka
The Lying Game by Ruth Ware
The Talker by Mary Sojourner
When the Sky Fell Apart by Caroline Lea
The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid
'Round Midnight by Laura McBride
The German Girl by Armando Lucas Correa
The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See
The Jane Austen Project by Kathleen A. Flynn
Last Things by Marissa Moss
All Our Wrong Todays by Elan Mastai
Civilianized by Michael Anthony
The Redemption of Galen Pike by Carys Davies
Woman No. 17 by Edan Lepucki
In the Woods of Memory by Shun Medoruma
Before the Wind by Jim Lynch
Dinner with Edward by Isabel Vincent
Inhabited by Charlie Quimby
Pachinko by Min Jin Lee
One Good Mama Bone by Bren McClain
The Excellent Lombards by Jane Hamilton
The Long Run by Catriona Menzies-Pike
You and I and Someone Else by Anna Schachner
Meantime by Katharine Noel
The Portrait by Antoine Laurain
So Much Blue by Perceval Everett
Good Karma by Christina Kelly
The Velveteen Daughter by Laurel Davis Huber
Mothers and Other Strangers by Gina Sorell
This Must Be the Place by Maggie O'Farrell
How to Find Love in a Bookshop by Veronica Henry
Between Them by Richard Ford
Kinship of Clover by Ellen Meeropol
The Life She Was Given by Ellen Marie Wiseman
The Clay Girl by Heather Tucker
Morningstar by Ann Hood
Lucky Boy by Shanthi Sekaran

Monday Mailbox

This past week's mailbox arrivals:

The Confectioner's Tale by Laura Madeleine came from Thomas Dunne Books.

Is there any doubt that I can't resist a novel about a love affair at a Paris patisserie and the granddaughter of one of the lovers uncovering the tale many years later? There shouldn't be. Because I can't. ;-)

Dreaming in Chocolate by Susan Bishop Crispell came from St. Martin's Griffin.

As if I need another reason to be interested in this one besides the luscious hot chocolate on the cover, this is the tale of a mother trying to fulfill her terminal little girl's wish list, tops on which is a specific dad. ::swoon::

Mothers of Sparta by Dawn Davies came from Flatiron Books.

A fiercely honest book about motherhood by a mother who has never been interested in comparing her mothering with others, this looks like a fantastic read for those of us who are mothers but without the socially sanctioned (and wholly created) maternal gene we read about so frequently anymore.

I Found My Tribe by Ruth Fitzmaurice came from Bloomsbury.

I can't wait to read this memoir of a woman who has surrounded herself with her tribe, a tribe that supports and nourishes her given her husband's ALS diagnosis, that swims with her in the freezing cold Irish Sea, and that helps her live this life.

The Lost Season of Love and Snow by Jennifer Laam came from St. Martin's Griffin.

The lives of famous author's wives fascinate me so I am definitely looking forward to this fictionalization of Natalya Goncharova Pushkin's life, the wife whose honor Pushkin died defending.

The Italian Party by Christina Lynch came from St. Martin's Press.

An American couple in Italy in the 1950s keeping secrets from each other? Oh, please don't fro me in that briar patch!!!

Points North by Howard Frank Mosher came from St. Martin's Press.

A collection of stories set in the Northeast Kingdom, I enjoy tales about these sorts of normal people I don't often run across in my own suburban daily life.

The Little French Guesthouse by Helen Pollard came from me to me.

Can't you tell this is a foreign publication just by the cover? And that it's about a young woman who goes on holiday with her boyfriend only to have him run off with the guesthouse owner's wife makes it just that much more delectable.

Flying by the Seat of My Knickers by Eliza Watson came from me to me.

Any book with knickers in the title must be good and hilarious, right? I am betting so with this first in a series about a woman who is trying to prove herself at her new job in Dublin.

Surfing with Sartre by Aaron James came from Doubleday as an Instagram contest win.

Surfing and philosophy seem like unlikely bedfellows so I am curious to see how the author pulls them together. And as a side note, this has the perfect cover for this content.

Pieces of Happiness by Anne Ostby came from Doubleday as an Instagram contest win.

About a group of high school friends in their sixties reuniting to live at one of the friends' cocoa farm in Fiji, what's not to love about this premise? I mean, aside from the fact that I can't possibly ever be invited to do the same thing since I don't have an old high school friend with a cocoa farm in Fiji.

The Goddesses by Swan Huntley came from Doubleday as an Instagram contest win.

A novel about manipulation, friendship, and marriage set in the lushness of Kona, Hawaii? Yep, right up my alley.

If you want to see the marvelous goodies in other people's mailboxes, make sure to visit Mailbox Monday and have fun seeing how we are all doing our part to keep the USPS and delivery services viable.

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